click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20110701
20110731
STATION
CNN 11
CNNW 11
KQED (PBS) 6
WETA 3
WHUT (Howard University Television) 3
KGO (ABC) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
MSNBC 2
WMPT (PBS) 2
WUSA (CBS) 2
CSPAN 1
CSPAN2 1
KCSM (PBS) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 54
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)
to be suspicious suggesting it was a suicide. this scandal is rocking britain but seems ready to explode here in the united states. the fbi investigating whether a news corp journalist tried to hack into the phones of 9/11 victims and survivors. calls in congress for a investigation. the fbi also says it's aware of reports that actor jude law's phone was hacked while he was in new york. the scandal shows no sign of slowing down. quite the contrary. possibly being replaced as the ceo of his own media empire. a man whose customer base is the whole world. anyone who watches "glee" or reads the "wall street journal" or anyone that goes to the movies or reads books. we have jeffrey toobin and matthew chance. and brian stelter. brian, we'll start with you, rupert murdoch stepping down in the world of media, that's a wow. true or maybe? >> right now it's a maybe. news corp will not deny the bloomberg report on the record. what they say on background, people around the company say there was no meeting today to talk about it. you can tell that's not a real denial. they may want this out here before th
is very much in britain. >> there's no shortage of people in the american media establishment and the american political establishment who have taken issue with the fact that the properties, fox news and the "new york post" have done business. that said, we've got to be careful. usually you don't want to get ahead of yourselves. in this one the story has each time surpassed your wildest expectations in the past two weeks. >> happened again this morning. >> absolutely right. i would say in terms of the american implications there's a question of whether british journalists for news corp broke the law here in 9/11. the evidence is scant. if the attorney general were to issue a wider ranging investigations, even actions that were illegal taken, for example, in great britain could reflect on the ability of news corp to hold on to american broadcasting licenses here. you could see repercussions under the question of the they interpreted as foreign officials being bribed as has been alleged with some substantive hearings. >> once you start an investigation, your don't know what kind
murdoch's newspapers in great britain now face their own accusations of appallinging wrong doing. their report target no less than the royal family and a former prime minister. in fact, gordon brown says the paper had links to criminals in order to hack into his bank accounts. and the medical records of his seriously ill son. meanwhile, members of parliament are demanding tough answers from police. how do they not uncover a hacking conspiracy that could mushroom to thousands of victims? let's get the latest from rivers live in london. they are asking murdoch and his son to testify? >> reporter: yeah. i mean, this is a pretty incredible development, inevitable, perhaps given the huge fury about the whole scandal. ruppert and rebecca brooks have been asked to appear before what is a select committee here which is a cross-party committee of members of parliament and can question people about a particular issue. the police involved in the current inquiry and in past inquiries have been questioned by a similar committee this morning. it's a pretty ferocious grilling that they get here
business in britain would be... would have been utterly beleaguered. it was he back in '86 that allowed newspaper innovation to come in. he took the "times" tabloid, everybody said he was crazy. this is a guy, for better or worse, who loves newspapers. and the "times" of london has been building up its foreign bureaus at a time. i mean, the "washington post" here is down to a handful. "chicago tribune" has known. he's been building up the foreign bureaus. he's had the courage to put up a pay wall and say "you've got to pay for what journalists do online." i wanted to point out that... ande's had tremendous courage in the very bold investments he's made. i spent along time with h 20 years ago when he was just embarking on sky b and fox here in the u.s. i don't like fox,ut to break theriopoly of the networks was an exaordinarily business achievement. now, fox's contribution to the situatioin the u.s. today is very damaging, i thin but as a bhed media executive, he has been the visionary, along with turner, i would say, of the last 20 to 30 years. >> rose: certainly in a global way. >> yea
are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the phone hacking scandal in britain came full comes full circle today, with word that the "news of the world" tabloid will cease to publish after 168 years in business. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: the news electrified britain-- sunday's edition of "news of the world"-- the most widely read english language newspaper in the world-- will be its last. in sun valley, idaho today, media mogul rupert murdoch-- owner of parent company news corporation-- had no comment on the tabloid's closure. but his son james murdoch said in a statement to staffers: fundamentally, action taken a number of years ago by certain individuals, in what had been a good newsroom have breached the trust that the news of the world has with its readers. >> warner: those mistakes first came to light in 2005 when "news of the world" was accused of hacking into cell phone messages of members of the royal family and famous actors. other revelations followed, amid an ongoing but fitful police inquiry. this week, public outrage exploded with le
become britain's answer to watergate. but this time, the bad guys are the newspaper men and women. hacking the phones not just of princes of the realm but also a 13-year-old murder victim, just to get a scoop. they allegedly did it with the help of corrupt police officers on the company payroll. already britain's top two policemen have resigned. now, the prime minister is in the cross hairs. david cameron is on the hot seat tomorrow. but today the focus was on the patriarch and his younger son, james. >> james and i would like to say how sorry we are for what has happened. >> reporter: both expressed regret. >> invading people's privacy by listening to their voicemail is wrong. paying police officece for information is wrong. >> it's a matter of great regret of mine, my father's and everyone at news corp. ration. >> reporter: they blamed n ns executives and reporters lower down the corp rate food chain. >> the people that i trusted to run it and then maybe the people they trusted. >> reporter: among murdoch's most trusted employees, his own children, who ran multimillion dollar ch
think it's important to understand that newspapers in britain play a very different role than they do here, because you don't have paid political advertising. you cannot run for office in britain without the support of a major newspaper chain. everybody needs murdoch's support. i think that eventually this is going to fade away. >> do you remember the phase willful blindness in connection with enron crimes? >> yes. it's looking the other way. >> do you think -- willful blindness will obtain in the case of prosecuting and perhaps convicting rupert? >> they may try. >> and his son. >> they may try. >> willful blind sentence. >> i don't think rupert has any -- hold it. i don't think rupert, as of now has any kind of criminal liability whatsoever. the people have a problem are below him. >> when you have a hot story, the editor, the people above say, how did you get that? it's diagnose to be very difficult to insulate the people at the top if these allegations prove true. >> let's see if we can >> thank you columbia, challenger, discovery, endeavour, and our ship atlantis. thank you for p
-coverage or visit travelers.com. >>> the scandal shaking up the murdoch empire in britain has now reached this shores with some asking whether news corp's activity here in the united states should be scrutinized. today frank lautenberg submitted a letter to the attorney general where he wrote the limited information already reported in this case raises serious questions about the legality of the conduct of news corporation and its subsidiaries under the fcpa. he goes on to say further investigation may reveal that current reports only scratch the surface of the problems at news corporation. accordingly, i am request that doj and the s.e.c. examine these circumstances and determine whether u.s. laws have been violated. the senator's letter mirrors similar outrage from senator rockefeller from west virginia and senator robert menendez of new jersey and today brought news that murdoch abandoned his bid to take over british sky broadcasting. the question remains how much power should one media baron have. joining us now is stephanie gosk. the withdrawal to the bskyb bid is a blow to rupert mu
right now. >>> thanks, wolf. good evening. tonight's britain's tabloid scandal escalates. two rupert murdoch-owned newspapers obtained and published information about prime minister gordon brown's family and finances. and tensions between the united states and syria, near a boiling point tonight. a government that beats its own people when they march peacefully slow to offer help when the united states embassy sund attack. >>> tonight the united states being unable to pay its bills because it's maxed out its credit line. to get more spending power president obama is trying to broker a deal with congress that would slash $2 trillion in red ink over the next decade. republicans refuse to raise taxes. president obama is left to sound like a nagging parent. no breakthrough at this afternoon's white house session. the president will reconvene the talks tomorrow. let's discuss the stakes and politics with jessica yellin and gloria borger. the sound we didn't quite have there was the time saying it's time to rip off the band-aid, eat our peas. he spent a half hour with the key negotiators i
irony that in the contrast between the sort of thing his newspapers have done in britain and what his politics is, the fox news cable channel here. we should at this point stressed that there is no evidence of any sort of misconduct by any of his american news outlets, be it fox or "the journal" or "the new york post." host: what is his reputation in the uk? guest: his reputation is it one of the most powerful people in the country. he owned almost 34% of the national media market. bskyb, which he on a share -- they blocked a controlling share -- is the big pay-tv service. he has been a huge figure in our public life for the past 20, 30 years, which is why so many of his opponents are so pleased that his reputation has not taken such a beating -- has now taken such a beating. host: next call for alex spillius comes from woodstock, illinois. caller: i picked up "the economist" magazine the other day, an excellent edition. on page 12, they go into their editorial basically, and it is based out of london. it says "if it is proven that news corp. managers conducted lawbreaking, they shoul
company. news corp. saying lots of tabloids in britain engaged in all sorts of outrageous behavior. you have rupert murdoch saying this is the most humble day of his life. which will we believe? that he and management are sorry or this is being made too much of by the rest of the press? >> it's a great question, howie. i've spoken about this before. you have here a real problem. i believe rupert is sincerely, sincerely appalled and sorry that in the case of mill lee dowler which is really what brought this scandal about when it was revealed that a teenage girl's phone was tampered with in order to sell newspapers because readers might think she was still alive. >> are the critics going overboard as the "wall street journal" editorial suggests? i have only a few seconds here. >> the "wall street journal" had the right to say that i think because there are plenty of other stories in your own country, watergate, the pentagon papers, and in england the daily telegraph two years ago paid for stolen records to expose mp's stolen expenses. there is a certain complicitness in britain and here t
britain. richard, first, help us understand the tabloid culture here. "news of the world," are they beyond the pale, are they that much more sleazy than the rest of the british tabloids, or did they just get caught? >> i think they were, to some extent, in a league of their own in terms of exclusives. and the truth of the matter is, whether it was stories about prince harry and his drug taking, david beckham and his affair or any of the other stories, max mosely of the formula one sensation, whatever it was, their stories always managed to have a certain truth about them. so they had a certain disgusting credibility about it. they were very sure about what they went to press with. as, indeed, all the tabloids are. you can't, you dare not with the british library laws, or what used to be, go to press with a story you're not pretty certain are true or you've got a defense. so you end up with this paper that spews out some of the most vitriolic sewage every week, but frankly, more often than not, gets away with it. >> so the question is, what next? i want to talk more about the specific examp
, and that means that we still have a big hole to fill. >> britain's phone hacking scandal reached prime minister cameron's office today. police arrested his one-time communications director, former "news of the world" editor, andy colson. allegations that the paper hacked the phones of celebrities and politicians cost colson his job at the "news of the world" back in 2007. he quit cameron's government in january as the scandal grew. the prime minister took responsibility for hiring colson, and called for government investigation into the paper's conduct. >> this is a wake-up call. over the decades, on the watch of both labor leaders and conservative leaders, politicians and the press have spent time courting support, not confront the problems. it's on my watch that the music has stopped. >> "news of the world" will fold after sunday's edition. the tabloid part of rupert murdoch's media empire which includes the waun"wall street journal," "new york post" and fox news. >> seven people and the gunman dead, grand rapids police say roderic dantzler opened fire at two different homes. dantzler's daugh
of the world" when the most disgraceful allegations took place. to many in britain she became the face of this scandal, right? >> reporter: yeah, now she has finally gone after days of sort of clinging on to her job by her fingernails with everyone from the prime minister downward saying she should go. finally, this morning, she did resign. that's not the end of the story yet. she and rupert and james murdoch all have to appear before a committee in the building behind me on tuesday and they will be grilled by politicians who want some answers as to who knew what and when. >> dan rivers live out of london, we will follow the fallout, of course, from that resignation. >>> it took one of the fbi's most intense manhunts to finally nail mob boss whitey bulger but even behind bars, what damage can he still do? deborah feyerick looks into that. >> i met whitey between the age of 15 and 16. >> reporter: john shay, nicknamed red, grew up in a tight knit world of south boston's old housing colony projects. a golden glove boxer with a wild streak wanted to be just like whitey bulger and the gang
scandal in great britain. no, he's not responsible, he says. and, no, he's not quitting. wer . while energy developement comes with some risk, north america's natural gas producers are committed to safely and responsibly providing decades of cleaner burning energy for our country, drilling thousands of feet below fresh water sources within self contained well systems and using state of the art monitoring technologies, rigorous practices help ensure our operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment we are america's natural gas. it's schwab at your fingertips wherever, whenever you want. one log in lets you monitor all of your balances and transfer between accounts, so your money can move as fast as you do. check out your portfolio, track the market with live updates. and execute trades anywhere and anytime the inspiration hits you. even deposit checks right from your phone. just take a picture, hit deposit and you're done. open an account today and put schwab mobile to work for you. can be even more powerful, with precise pain relieving cream. it blocks pain si
thank you and good-bye from britain's best-selling tabloid, the latest fallout from the phone hacking scandal on "morning joe." somewhere in america, there's a doctor who can peer into the future. there's a nurse who can access in an instant every patient's past. and because the whole hospital's working together, there's a family who can breathe easy, right now. somewhere in america, we've already answered some of the nation's toughest healthcare questions. and the over 60,000 people of siemens are ready to do it again. siemens. answers. >>> 47 past the hour. after weeks of controversy, resignations and arrests, britain's "news of the world" published its last issue on sunday. it comes as its rooival, "the mirror," claims today that a new york police officer asked for voice mails of 9/11 victims. stephanie gosk reports on the "news of the world's" demise and its final day. >> with the ink barely dry on the final edition of news of the world, 80-year-old media baron rupert murdoch traveled to the uk to do damage control. on display, his unqualified support of melissa brooks. smiles for
murdoch's testimony on britain's phone hacking scandal is being challenged. he could face a police investigation. a member of parliament is call forg a police investigation as to whether or not murdoch was involved in the efforts to cover up the scandal. james murdoch said he wasn't aware of an e-mail suggesting the hacking involved more than just one rogue reporter at the the now defunct "news of the world" tabloid. and murdoch says he stands by his statement. >>> the federal aviation administration faces a partial shutdown unless congress has stop gap funding. secretary of transportation says safety will not be compromised. the government will lose every week. >>> the senate today rejected a house republican bill to require congress to slash spending. the cap and balance budget amendment. the move did nothing to resolve the issue of how to raise the debt ceiling to avoid a government default. a short while before the vote house speaker, john boehner, told reporters he and president obama had not reached an agreement on solving the debt crisis. the government is in danger of defau
. be careful out there. >> balmy. >>> pretty hot in the uk as this continues, this story here. britain's prime minister will feel the heat as he answers questions from parliament about the phone-hacking scandal. that's after media mogul rupert murdoch and his son testified yesterday. the bbc's nick robinson reports from london. >> reporter: the policemen, in case you wondered, are there to protect rupert and james murdoch, not take them in for questioning. the 80-year-old tycoon's wife wendi was behind him, offering physical and emotional support. his son and once heir apparent sat anxiously and protectively at his side throughout. >> i would like to say as well just how sorry i am and how sorry we are. >> reporter: they were sorry. they were humble. but whose fault was the criminality in their company? >> mr. murdoch, do you accept ultimately you are responsible for this whole fiasco? >> no. >> you are not responsible? who is responsible? >> the people that i trusted to run it and then maybe the people they trusted. >> reporter: who that was, he wouldn't say. >> this is not an excuse. maybe i
. siemens. answers. >>> another blockbuster headline today in great britain's tabloid hacking scandal. the media barren rupert murdoch and his top deputies summoned before parliament next week. today a top police official said that it's highly possible that officials sold secrets to murdoch's newspapers. >> reporter: the multifaceted phone hacking scandal is suddenly focused on current and former police officers at london's scotland yard. called before plig politicians answer accusations of systemic incompetence and their answers are telling. >> we know that, there always will be. >> reporter: so who did take bribes? among those questioned, former police officer andy hayman who now writes for "news international." ironic that he led a criticized investigation against the company for phone hacking in 2006. >> while a police officer, did you ever receive payment from any news -- >> good god! absolutely not. i can't believe you suggested that. >> lots of people -- >> come on. absolutely no way. i can say to you -- >> mr. hayman -- >> no, come on, chairman, that's not fair. >> the police
and i came here with great respect for all of you, the parliament and people of britain you represent. this is the most humble day of my career. and all that has happened i know that we needed to be here today. james and i would like to see how sorry we are for what has happened especially with regard to people's crime. >> our company has 52,000, i fled for 57 years and i've made my share of mistakes many countries and hard-working journalists. i learned that nearly 200 newspapers come for different sizes and countless stories of the families of the world at no time do i remember being as second as when the family had to endure which i think his last. nor do i have recall things as angry as when i was told that the news of the world could have compounded their distress. i want to thank keefer graciously giving me the opportunity to apologize in person. i would like all the victims of the phone hacking to know how completely and deeply sorry i am. apologizing cannot take place with his happened but still, i want them to know my regret of the horrible invasions' of their lives. i unders
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 54 (some duplicates have been removed)